CS 255/455 Spring 2018

CSC 255/455 Software Analysis and Improvement (Spring 2017)

Lecture slides, reading, later assignments, and other material will be distributed through Blackboard.


 Course description

With the increasing diversity and complexity of computers and their applications, the development of efficient, reliable software has become increasingly dependent on automatic support from compilers & other program analysis and translation tools. This course covers principal topics in understanding and transforming programs by the compiler and at run time. Specific techniques include data flow and dependence theories and analyses; type checking and program correctness, security, and verification; memory and cache management; static and dynamic program transformation; and performance analysis and modeling.

Course projects include the design and implementation of program analysis and improvement tools.  Meets jointly with CSC 255, an undergraduate-level course whose requirement includes a subset of topics and a simpler version of the project.

 Instructor and grading

Teaching staff: Chen Ding, Prof., Wegmans Hall Rm 3407, x51373;  Fangzhou Liu, Grad TA;  Zhizhou Zhang, Undergrad TA.

Lectures: Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:25am-11:40am, Hylan 202

Office hours: Ding, Fridays 11am to noon (and Mondays for any 15 minute period between 3:30pm and 5:30pm if pre-arranged).

TA Office hours: Zhizhou, Mondays 2 to 3pm, open area outside the elevator, third floor Wegmans Hall.  Jerry, Tuesdays 3 to 4pm, 3407 Wegmans Hall.

Grading (total 100%)

  • midterm and final exams are 15% and 20% respectively
  • the projects total to 40% (LVN 5%, LLVM trivial 5%, loop+index 10%, dep 10%, par 10%)
  • written assignments are 25% (trivial 1%; 4 assignments 6% each)

 Textbooks and other resources (on reserve at Carlson)

Optimizing Compilers for Modern Architectures (UR access through books24x7), Randy Allen and Ken Kennedy, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, 2001. Chapters 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. lecture notes from Ken Kennedy. On-line Errata

Engineering a Compiler, (2nd edition preferred, 1st okay), Keith D. Cooper and Linda Torczon, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers. Chapters 1, 8, 9, 10, 12 and 13 (both editions). lecture notes and additional reading from Keith Cooper. On-line Errata

Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools (2nd edition), Alfred V. Aho, Monica S. Lam, Ravi Sethi, and Jeffrey D. Ullman, Pearson.

Static Single Assignment Book, Rastello et al. (in progress)

Introduction to Lattices and Order,  Davey and Priestley, Cambridge University Press.

2017 2nd URCSSA Alumni Summit

On Oct. 26, Dr. Chengliang Zhang, former graduate and now Staff Software Engineer at Google Seattle,  was invited by Chinese Student and Scholar Association (URCSSA) to speak at the second Alumni Summit titled Cloud | Big Data | AI.  The compiler group held a separate mini-symposium to present our research and had lunch with our esteemed graduate.



Three Walls by the Monday’s keynote speaker Peter Kogge, University of Notre Dame


Memory Equalizer for Lateral Management of Heterogeneous Memory
Chen Ding (University of Rochester), Chencheng Ye (Huazhong University of Science and Technology), Hai Jin (Huazhong University of Science and Technology)


Spirited Discussion

Memory Systems Problems and Solutions

• Chen Ding, University of Rochester
• David Donofrio, Berkeley Labs
• Scott Lloyd, LLNL
• Dave Resnick, Sandia
• Uzi Vishkin, University of Maryland

Sally McKee: on Chip Cache

David Wang keynote

Hotel accommodation and conference dinner (and investigation … of murder)


Joel Fest

From Lane: “On Labor Day (Sept. 4), URCS will host a day of talks by wonderful speakers … in honor of our wonderful colleague Joel I. Seiferas’s retirement.”

JS: “Good morning and welcome. As the ‘Joel’ of ‘JoelFest,’ I have asked to say a (very) few words of introduction.

I can’t take credit for today’s program of distinguished speakers (or the presence of other notable colleagues), but I am happy that my recent retirement can be the excuse for it. I hope everyone enjoys and is stimulated by what you hear today.


Thanks for today are also due to all of the following:  …

  • the entire well-oiled machine of an organizing committee, including, in addition to Muthu and Lane, Prof. Daniel Stefankovic and my wife Diane, and of course our distinguished speakers, to be introduced individually. 

Anyway, the U. of R. is clearly a great place to retire from.

More significantly (but briefly), Rochester also has been a wonderful place to work since I came here in 1979:

  • Faculty, past and present, have always been collegial, generous, smart, eloquent, and a pleasure to work with.
  • Past and present staff has always been eager and successful in providing the best support for the department.
  • The graduate students, especially, have been enthusiastic participants in the community, even in learning experiences much broader than what they needed for their theses.
  • In later years, the growing undergraduate community has become an impressive part of the mix, with many remarkable gems emerging there as well.”

 Speakers at JoelFest (full details see http://www.cs.rochester.edu/~lane/=joelfest/)

  • Zvi Galil, the John P. Imlay Dean of Computing and Professor at Georgia Tech’s College of Computing, “Online Revolutions: From Stringology with Joel to Georgia Tech’s Highly Affordable Master Degree”
  • Shafi Goldwasser, the RSA Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, “Pseudo-determinism”
  • Jon Kleinberg, Tisch University Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University, “Social Dynamics and Mathematical Inevitability”
  • Muthuramakrishnan Venkitasubramaniam, Department of Computer Science, University of Rochester, “The Status of Zero-Knowledge Proofs”