CSC 253/453 Fall 2018

CSC 253/453 Fall 2018

Dynamic Language & Software Development

Prerequisites: CSC 252 and CSC 254 are required for CSC 453 and recommended for CSC 253. Familiarity with a dynamic programming language such as Python is required for CSC 253.
Crosslisted: TCS 453 (same requirement as CSC 253)

This course studies dynamically-typed programming languages and modular software development. Topics include principles and practice of modular design, functional and object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering concepts, software correctness and reliability, programming tools, and design examples. Ruby is used as the main instruction language. The lessons complement those in traditional compilers and programming languages courses, which focus mainly on statically-typed languages and individual algorithms rather than system design. A significant portion of the assignment is a group project.

Teaching Staff and office hours:  Prof. Chen Ding, Fridays 11am to 12pm in Wegmans Hall 3407, x51373.  Yu Feng, 5pm to 6pm, Mondays and Wednesdays, Wegmans Hall 3407.   Patrick Ferner, 2:30pm to 3:30pm, Tuesdays, Wegmans 2215 (updated 9/11).

Policies for grading, attendance, and academic honesty (updated 8/27)

Grading:

  • mid-term and final exams, 15% each
  • two written homeworks, 5% each
  • assignments and projects, 60%

Assignments are typically handed out on Wednesday and due the following Tuesday midnight.

Preparation (before first class):

“No Silver Bullet — Essence and Accidents of Software Engineering” is a classic paper on software engineering written by Turing Award winner Fred Brooks in 1986.  Read the paper (available here if accessed inside the UR network) pages 3 to 5 on the “essential difficulties” of software development and skim the rest of the paper.

“A former member of the SD10 Panel on Computing in Support of Battle Management explains why he believes the ‘star wars’ effort will not achieve its stated goals.”  Read the paper (available here if accessed inside the UR network) pages 2 to 4 the section titled “Why software is unreliable.”  Which of the “essential difficulties” was Parnas discussing?

More background of this debate, detailed rationales and an illuminating discussion of the ethical issues can be found in another article of Parnas: “SDI: A Violation of Professional Responsibility”.  The article does not seem to have a free version online, but you can read it by borrowing the book “Software Fundamentals” (included as Chapter 27) from the textbook reserve for CSC 253/453 at the Carlson Library.  The lease is two hours.

Further material will be distributed through the Blackboard web site  for students who have registered.  Contact the instructor if you have problem accessing the site.

Textbooks (online access at learn.rochester.edu > CSC 253 > Reserves > Materials on Reserve in the Library):

Software fundamentals : collected papers by David L. Parnas
Author: Parnas, David Lorge.
Imprint: Boston : Addison-Wesley, 2001.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: QA76.754 .P365 2001

Object-oriented Software Engineering
Author: Schach, Stephen R.
Imprint: New York : McGraw-Hill, c2008.
Available at school book store. On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor

Design patterns in Ruby [electronic resource]
Author: Olsen, Russ.
Imprint: Upper Saddle River, NJ : Addison-Wesley, c2008.
Available through Carlson Library at: Internet

Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation (http://cs.brown.edu/~sk/Publications/Books/ProgLangs/2007-04-26/)
Copyright © 2003-07, Shriram Krishnamurthi
(Also see Prof. Findler’s course EECS 321 at https://www.eecs.northwestern.edu/~robby/courses/)

Other Materials

Ruby under a microscope [electronic resource] : an illustrated guide to Ruby internals
Author: Shaughnessy, Pat.
Imprint: San Francisco : No Starch Press, [2014]
Available at school book store.  Also on Reserve at: Internet
Fundamentals of software engineering
Author: Ghezzi, Carlo.
Imprint: Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2003.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: QA76.758 .G47 2003

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE PRAGMATICS, 3rd ed
Author: Scott, Michael L.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: CRL PersCpy

Topics:

See schedule

 

Policies for CSC 2/453

The workload will be heavy.   Be sure to read instructions for each assignment and exam carefully, start the assignment early, know where/when to seek help, and work with peers.

Grades will be released periodically to Blackboard, the University’s on-line course management system.  

Attendance and Class Participation

Class attendance is mandatory.  Please arrive on time.  I expect to start at 3:25 sharp, and late arrivals disturb the folks who are already there.    You are encourage to ask or answer questions in class.  I may call on you just to know what you think.  As a general rule, if there’s something you don’t understand, make me stop and explain it.  There are probably a dozen people sitting around you who didn’t understand it either, but don’t have the nerve to say so.  Likewise, if I’m belaboring something that everyone understands, prod me to move on.

I will assign reading before and after lectures.   Reading is mandatory  It includes all lecture slides released to Blackboard, and textbook chapters/sections listed on the first slide of each lecture.   Keep in mind that the exams include topics covered in class and in the required reading. 

Late Submission Policy

A student may have a total of two extra days in all assignments.  They can be used as either a one-day extension for two assignments, or a two-day extension for one assignment.  A student must inform the TA about the extension before the due time.  No other late submission is permitted.

Academic Honesty

Student conduct in CSC 2/453 is governed by the College Academic Honesty Policy, the Undergraduate Laboratory Policies of the Computer Science Department, and the University’s Acceptable Use Policy for Information Technology.  I helped to draft some of the descriptions.  I believe in them strongly, and will enforce them aggressively.

The following are details specific to CSC 2/453.

Exams in CSC 2/453 must be strictly individual work.

Collaboration on programming assignments among team members is of course expected.  Collaboration on assignments acrossteams is encouraged at the level of ideas.  Feel free to ask each other questions, brainstorm on algorithms, or work together at a whiteboard.  You may not claim work as your own, however, unless you transform the ideas into substance by yourself.  Among other things, this means that you must leave any brainstorming sessions with no written or electronic notes—only what you carry in your head.

If you use the work of others (e.g., you download a function from the web at the last minute so that you can get the rest of your project working), then (1) either you must have the author’s explicit permission or the material must be publicly available, and (2) you must label what you copied, clearly and prominently, when you hand it in.  You will of course get points only for the parts of your assignment that you wrote yourself.

To minimize the temptation to steal code, all students are expected to protect any directories or on-line repositories in which they do their work.

For purposes of this class, academic dishonesty is defined as

  • Any attempt to pass off work on an exam or quiz that didn’t come straight out of your own head.
  • Any collaboration on assignments beyond the sharing of ideas, unless the collaborating parties clearly and prominently explain exactly who did what, at turn-in time.
  • Any activity that has the effect of significantly impairing the ability of another student to learn.  Examples here might include destroying the work of others, interfering with their access to resources, or deliberately providing them with misleading information.

Note that grades in CSC 2/453 are assigned on the basis of individual merit rather than relative standing, so there is no benefit—even a dishonest one—to be gained by sabotaging the work of others.

I work under the assumption that students are honest.  I will not go looking for exceptions.  If I discover one, however, I will come down on it very hard.  Over the past few years, I have submitted about a dozen cases to the College Board on Academic Honesty.  All resulted in major penalties for the students involved.

CSC 253 Fall 2017

CSC 253/453 Dynamic Language & Software Development

Prerequisites: CSC 252 and CSC 254 are required for CSC 453 and recommended for CSC 253. Familiarity with a dynamic programming language such as Python is required for CSC 253.
Crosslisted: TCS 453 (same requirement as CSC 253)

This course studies dynamically-typed programming languages and modular software development. Topics include principles and practice of modular design, functional and object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering concepts, software correctness and reliability, programming tools, and design examples. Ruby is used as the main instruction language. The lessons complement those in traditional compilers and programming languages courses, which focus mainly on statically-typed languages and individual algorithms rather than system design. A significant portion of the assignment is a group project.

Teaching Staff and office hours:  Prof. Chen Ding, Fridays 11am to 12pm in Wegmans Hall 3407, x51373.  John Jacob, 1pm to 2, Tuesdays, in the corner next to Wegmans Hall 3409.  Zhizhou Zhang, 3:30pm to 4:30, Thursdays, Wegmans Hall 3407, x51373.

Grading:

  • mid-term and final exams, 15% each
  • two written homeworks, 5% each
  • assignments and projects, 60%

Preparation (before first class):

“No Silver Bullet — Essence and Accidents of Software Engineering” is a classic paper on software engineering written by Turing Award winner Fred Brooks in 1986.  Read the paper (available here if accessed inside the UR network) especially pages 3 to 5 on the “essential difficulties” of software development.

“A former member of the SD10 Panel on Computing in Support of Battle Management explains why he believes the ‘star wars’ effort will not achieve its stated goals.”  Read the paper (available here if accessed inside the UR network) pages 2 to 4 the section titled “Why software is unreliable.”  Which of the “essential difficulties” was Parnas discussing?

More background of this debate, detailed rationales and an illuminating discussion of the ethical issues can be found in another article of Parnas: “SDI: A Violation of Professional Responsibility”.  The article does not seem to have a free version online, but you can read it by borrowing the book “Software Fundamentals” (included as Chapter 27) from the textbook reserve for CSC 253/453 at the Carlson Library.  The lease is two hours.

Further material will be distributed through the Blackboard web site  for students who have registered.  Contact the instructor if you have problem accessing the site.

Textbooks (online access at learn.rochester.edu > CSC 253 > Reserves > Materials on Reserve in the Library):

Software fundamentals : collected papers by David L. Parnas
Author: Parnas, David Lorge.
Imprint: Boston : Addison-Wesley, 2001.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: QA76.754 .P365 2001

Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation (http://cs.brown.edu/~sk/Publications/Books/ProgLangs/2007-04-26/)
Copyright © 2003-07, Shriram Krishnamurthi
(Also see Prof. Findler’s course EECS 321 at https://www.eecs.northwestern.edu/~robby/courses/)

Object-oriented Software Engineering
Author: Schach, Stephen R.
Imprint: New York : McGraw-Hill, c2008.
Available at school book store. On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor

Design patterns in Ruby [electronic resource]
Author: Olsen, Russ.
Imprint: Upper Saddle River, NJ : Addison-Wesley, c2008.
On Reserve at: Internet

 

Other Materials

Ruby under a microscope [electronic resource] : an illustrated guide to Ruby internals
Author: Shaughnessy, Pat.
Imprint: San Francisco : No Starch Press, [2014]
Available at school book store.  Also on Reserve at: Internet
Fundamentals of software engineering
Author: Ghezzi, Carlo.
Imprint: Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2003.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: QA76.758 .G47 2003

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE PRAGMATICS, 3rd ed
Author: Scott, Michael L.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: CRL PersCpy

 

Topics:

See schedule

 

Robby Findler seminar and guest lecture

 

Macros matter: effectively building lots of programming languages
Robby Findler
Northwestern University & PLT
Monday, November 14, 2016

Building new programming languages from whole cloth is a difficult proposition at best. Macro system provide an alternative; they support the construction of new programming languages from existing pieces, while still providing the flexibility to radically change the syntax and semantics of the programming language.

In this talk, I will give a high-level overview of the myriad of programming languages that Racket supports, as well as an overview of the research area of macros, showing what can be accomplished with them and introducing some of the associated technical challenges (and their solutions).

Robby Findler is currently an Associate Professor at Northwestern University, and received his PhD from Rice University in 2002. His research area is programming languages and he focuses on programming environments, software contracts, and tools for modeling operational semantics. He maintains DrRacket, the program development environment for the programming language Racket and he co-authored the book _How to Design Programs_, a textbook for teaching introductory programming.

(URCS seminar announcement)

Slides

(CSC 253/453 Guest Lecture)  Redex: A Language for Lightweight Semantics Engineering

Professor Robby Findler, Northwestern University

Redex is a programming language designed to support semantics engineers as they experiment with programming language models.  To explore a model, an engineer writes down grammars, type systems, and operational semantics in a notation inspired by the programming languages literature. Redex breathes life into the model, building typing derivations, running example expressions, and using random generation to falsify claims about the model.

This talk gives an overview of Redex, motivating its design choices and giving a sense of how it feels to program in Redex. Then the talk dives into some of the techniques that Redex uses to generate random expressions.

A video by Prof. Findler on Redex

https://docs.racket-lang.org/redex/

CSC 253 Fall 2016

CSC 253/453 Dynamic Language & Software Development

Prerequisites: CSC 252 and CSC 254 are required for CSC 453 and recommended for others. Familiarity with a dynamic programming language such as Python.
Crosslisted: TCS 453

This course studies dynamically-typed programming languages and modular software development. Topics include principles and practice of modular design, functional and object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering concepts, software correctness and reliability, programming tools, and design examples. Ruby is used as the main instruction language. The lessons complement those in traditional compilers and programming languages courses, which focus mainly on statically-typed languages and individual algorithms rather than system design. A significant portion of the assignment is a group project.

Teaching Staff and office hours:  Prof. Chen Ding, Fridays 11am to 12pm in CSB 720; John Jacobs, Thursdays 3:30-4:30pm in CSB 720.

Preparation (before first class):

“No Silver Bullet — Essence and Accidents of Software Engineering” is a classic paper on software engineering written by Turing Award winner Fred Brooks in 1986.  Read the paper (available here if accessed inside the UR network) especially pages 3 to 5 on the “essential difficulties” of software development.

“A former member of the SD10 Panel on Computing in Support of Battle Management explains why he believes the ‘star wars’ effort will not achieve its stated goals.”  Read the paper (available here if accessed inside the UR network) pages 2 to 4 the section titled “Why software is unreliable.”  Which of the “essential difficulties” was Parnas discussing?

More background of this debate, detailed rationales and an illuminating discussion of the ethical issues can be found in another article of Parnas: “SDI: A Violation of Professional Responsibility”.  The article does not seem to have a free version online, but you can read it by borrowing the book “Software Fundamentals” (included as Chapter 27) from the textbook reserve for CSC 253/453 at the Carlson Library.  The lease is two hours.

Further material will be distributed through the Blackboard web site  for students who have registered.  Contact the instructor if you have problem accessing the site.

Textbooks:
Design patterns in Ruby
Author: Olsen, Russ.
Imprint: Upper Saddle River, NJ : Addison-Wesley, c2008.
On Reserve at: Internet

Fundamentals of software engineering
Author: Ghezzi, Carlo.
Imprint: Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2003.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: QA76.758 .G47 2003

Object-oriented and classical software engineering
Author: Schach, Stephen R.
Imprint: New York : McGraw-Hill, c2011.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: QA76.758 .S318 2011

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE PRAGMATICS, 3rd ed
Author: Scott, Michael L.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: CRL PersCpy

Software fundamentals : collected papers by David L. Parnas
Author: Parnas, David Lorge.
Imprint: Boston : Addison-Wesley, 2001.
On Reserve at: Carlson Library Reserve Desk 2nd Floor
Call Number: QA76.754 .P365 2001

Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation (http://cs.brown.edu/~sk/Publications/Books/ProgLangs/2007-04-26/)
Copyright © 2003-07, Shriram Krishnamurthi
(Also see Prof. Findler’s course EECS 321 at https://www.eecs.northwestern.edu/~robby/courses/)

Topics:

schedule

schedule.numbers-2016 topics